Bioengineering Senior Design 2021

Each Penn Bioengineering (BE) student’s undergraduate experience culminates in Senior Design, a two-semester capstone project in which student teams conceive, design, and develop a bioengineering project, whether a medical device, molecular biological therapeutic, or research tool. Projects are inherently interdisciplinary, and can involve biomaterials, electronics, mechanics, molecular biology, nanotechnology, and microfluidics. Research and development is supervised by BE faculty, lab staff, and graduate student TA’s and project managers, and work is conducted in the George H. Stephenson Foundation Educational Laboratory & Bio-MakerSpace (which successfully reopened for in-person activities this Spring semester).

This year’s 11 teams included the variety and innovation we’ve come to expect from our outstanding students, ranging from devices which track medical conditions, such afib and POTS, to technology responding to our post-COVID world, such as a disinfecting robot and a kit to make telemedicine more effective. The year finished with presentations to alumni judges, and BE’s annual Demo Day (the only in-person demo day on the engineering campus this year) on April 15, 2021, in which students showcased their designs to faculty.

Several teams were highlighted for awards recognition.

  • Tula won the Grand Prize Award at the Weiss Tech House Senior Design Pitch competition, sponsored by Penn’s Weiss Tech House, as well as a Berkman Opportunity Fund grant from Penn Engineering. Tula’s members are Bioengineering student Shreya Parchure (BSE 2021 & MSE 2021), Mechanical Engineering student Miriam Glickman (BSE 2021 & MSE 2022), and Computer Science students Ebtihal Jasim (BSE 2021) and Tiffany Tsang (BSE 2021).
  • TelemedTree (David Alanis Garza, Aurora Cenaj & Raveen Kariyawasam) and rUmVA (Yasmina Al Ghadban, Rachel Madhogarhia, Jeong Inn Park, Robert Paslaski & Phuong Vu) also received Berkman Opportunity Fund grants.
  • RHO Therapeutics was named a finalist in the Rice 360 Design Competition for 2021 (David Bartolome, Ethan Boyer, Patrisia de Anda, Kelly Feng & Jenny Nguyen).
  • OtoAI (Yash Lahoti, Nikhil Maheshwari, Jonathan Mairena, Krishna Suresh & Uday Tripathi) took home a Wharton Venture Lab’s Innovation Fund Validation Phase Award for 2021 and won the Technology and Innovation Prize for Penn Engineering’s interdepartmental Senior Design Competition.
  • In addition, three teams won BE’s internal Senior Design competition: IdentiFly (MEAM student Armando Cabrera, ESE student Ethan Chaffee, MEAM student Zachary Lane, ESE student Nicoleta Manu & BE student Abum Okemgbo), OtoAI, and rUmVa.

Short descriptions of each project are below. See each project’s full abstract, final paper, and video presentation here. The full 2021 presentation Youtube playlist is linked below.

reActive is a low-cost wearable device that measures ground reaction force as well as knee angle to aid physical therapists in quantifying an athlete’s recovery from an ACL injury.

EndoMagno is a novel magnetic endoscopy probe that effectively grips metallic objects by interfacing with an endoscope.

NoFib is an at-home wearable for athletes with histories of atrial fibrillation or those recovering from ablation surgeries who wish to continue their workout regimen and track their cardiac recovery without needing to leave their residence.

Tula is a smart compression stocking platform to improve quality of life for people with Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), a disease which causes fainting upon standing due to blood pooling in legs. Tula can predict a POTS attack through real-time heart rate monitoring and then prevent fainting using dynamic compression.

RHO Therapeutics is a low-cost, wearable glove device that trains fine motor movements using a rehabilitative game that causes motor-mediated flexion and extension of the patient’s hand to aid in chronic stroke rehabilitation. 

EarForce aims to monitor fighter pilots’ health during training and in-flight missions via a low-cost headphone system. The device collects physiological data through the ear and is compatible with existing pilot headphone systems.

IdentiFly is a low-cost device which will provide labs with an easy to integrate way to automatically sort fruit flies by sex. 

TeleMedTree introduces a new level of telemedicine. It is an affordable precision-focused, at-home diagnostic kit to help immunocompromised individuals with respiratory conditions receive a high quality monitoring of their health that is on par or better than what is possible during an in-person visit.

OtoAI is a novel digital otoscope that enables primary care physicians to take images of the inner ear and leverages machine learning to diagnose abnormal ear pathologies.

Synchro-Sense is a device which detects when patients on ventilators are at maximum inhalation and triggers an X-ray image capture for accuracy. 

rUmVa is a cost-effective, autonomous robot that can quickly disinfect rooms by intelligently sanitizing high-touch surfaces and the air. 

Senior Design 2021 Presentation Playlist

Penn Dental, Penn Engineering Unite to Form Center for Innovation & Precision Dentistry

by Beth Adams

With the shared vision to transform the future of oral health care, Penn Dental Medicine and Penn’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have united to form the Center for Innovation & Precision Dentistry (CiPD). The new Center marked its official launch on January 22 with a virtual program celebrating the goals and plans of this unique partnership. Along with the Deans from both schools, the event gathered partners from throughout the University of Pennsylvania and invited guests, including the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Director (NIDCR) Dr. Rena D’Souza and IADR Executive Director Chris Fox.

Conceived and brought to fruition by co-directors Dr. Michel Koo of Penn Dental Medicine and Dr. Kathleen Stebe of Penn Engineering, the CiPD is bridging the two schools through cutting-edge research and technologies to accelerate the development of new solutions and devices to address unmet needs in oral health, particularly in the areas of dental caries, periodontal disease, and head and neck cancer. The CiPD will also place a high priority on programs to train the next generation of leaders in oral health care innovation.

“We have a tremendous global health challenge. Oral diseases and craniofacial disorders affect 3.5 billion people, disproportionately affecting the poor and the medically and physically compromised,” says Dr. Koo, Professor in the Department of Orthodontics and Divisions of Community Oral Health and Pediatric Dentistry, in describing their motivation to form the Center. “There is an urgent need to find better ways to diagnose, prevent, and treat these conditions, particularly in ways that are affordable and accessible for the most susceptible populations. That is our driving force for putting this Center together.”

“We have united our schools around this mission,” adds Dr. Stebe, Richer & Elizabeth Goodwin Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. “We have formed a community of scholars to develop and harness new engineering paradigms, to generate new knowledge, and to seek new approaches that are more effective, precise, and affordable to address oral health. More importantly, we will train a new community of scholars to impact this space.”

Born through Interdisciplinary Research

A serendipitous connection born through Penn’s interdisciplinary research environment itself brought Drs. Koo and Stebe together more than five years ago, an introduction that would eventually lead to creating the CiPD.

Dr. Tagbo Niepa, now assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh, came to Penn Engineering in 2014 as part of Penn’s Postdoctoral Fellowship for Academic Diversity, an initiative from the office of the Vice Provost for Research. His studies on the microbiome led him to reach out to Dr. Stebe and Dr. Daeyeon Lee (also at Penn Engineering), and to connect them to Dr. Koo, initiating collaboration between their labs.

“Tagbo embodies what we are trying to do with the CiPD,” recalls Dr. Stebe. “He had initiative, he identified new tools and important context, and he did good science that may help us understand how to interrupt the disease process and identify new underlying mechanisms that can inspire new therapies.” Dr. Niepa worked on applying microfluidics and engineering to study the oral microbiome and better understand how the interactions between fungi and bacteria could impact dental caries.

“Upon meeting Michel, we became excited about the possibilities of bringing talent from the two schools together,” notes Dr. Stebe. A 2018 workshop organized by Drs. Koo and Stebe and funded by Penn’s Vice Provost of Research explored the potential for expanding cross-school research. “We invited researchers from dental medicine and engineering as well as relevant people from the arts and sciences to see if we could find a way to collaborate to advance oral and craniofacial health,” says Dr. Koo. “That was the catalyst for the Center; after the workshop, we put together a task force which would become the core members of the CiPD.”

In addition to Drs. Koo and Stebe, the CiPD Executive Committee includes Associate Directors Dr. Henry Daniell, Vice-Chair and W.D. Miller Professor, Department of Basic & Translational Sciences, Penn Dental Medicine, and Dr. Anh Le, Chair and Norman Vine Endowed Professor of Oral Rehabilitation, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery / Pharmacology, Penn Dental Medicine; as well as Dr. Andrew Tsourkas, Professor, Department of Bioengineering, Co-Director, Center for Targeted Therapeutics & Translational Nanomedicine (CT3N) and Chemical and Nanoparticle Synthesis Core, Penn Engineering; and Dr. Jason Moore, Edward Rose Professor of Informatics, Director of the Penn Institute for Biomedical Informatics. The core members of CiPD include 26 faculty from across both Penn Dental Medicine and Penn Engineering, and also from the Schools of Medicine and Arts & Sciences.

Read the full story in Penn Today.

Penn Engineers at the Forefront of Penn’s ‘Innovation Ecosystem’

By Lauren Salig

Andrei Georgescu, a member of Dan Huh’s bioengineering laboratory, prepares microfluidics for the lab’s work on organ-on-a-chip technology. Their innovative research was one of many Engineering projects featured in a recent video.

The University of Pennsylvania is highlighting its “ecosystem of innovation” in a new video, featuring some of the most cutting-edge work being done on campus and the infrastructure supporting that work. Alongside shots of the Singh Center for Nanotechnology, the Pennovation Center and the coming VentureLab are the familiar faces of Penn Engineers inventing the future.

The video includes the voices of Vijay Kumar, the Nemirovsky Family Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science; Dawn Bonnell, Penn’s Vice Provost of Research and the Henry Robinson Towne Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; and Konrad Kording, a Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor of Neurosciences and Bioengineering — each discussing the collaborative environment at the University.

A quick watch of the video reveals glimpses into Penn Engineering labs and projects where much of Penn’s innovation happens: PERCH’s flying robots that swarm together without using GPS, an investigation into 2-D room-temperature platforms for quantum technology, testing mechanical walking algorithms on robotic legs named Cassie, organs-on-a-chip that aid the study of diseases on Earth and in space, President’s Innovation Prize winners’ nanoscale implant company Visiplate aiming to treat blindness, blueprints for nanocrystals that self-assemble into materials with unique properties, Penn Electric Racing’s four-wheel drive competitive racecar, and PERCH lab spin-off Ghost Robotic’s Minitaur robot that senses the ground beneath its metal feet.

See if you can spot these Penn Engineering contributions in the video at Penn Today.

This article was originally posted on the Penn Engineering Medium blog.